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Salvatore SESSA

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Assistant Professor
International Center for Science and Engineering Programs
Faculty of Science and Engineering
Waseda University





BIOGRAPHY:

Education: I received my M.Sc. degrees and Ph.D. in Electronic and Control Engineering from the University of Catania, Catania, Italy in 2004 and 2008 respectively. My Ph.D. was fund by STMictroelectronics, and the thesis title was "Mobile Robots in indoor environments: Localization, Navigation and Enhanced Teleguide".

From Sept 2008 to Sept 2010: Visiting Researcher at Takanishi Lab in Waseda University. I awarded a scholarship awarded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science “JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Foreign Researchers” to conduct research in Japan for a period of 2 years.  In this period, his research was focused on inertial sensors for human motion analysis.

From Oct 2010 to Mar 2014: Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering at Waseda University. 

From 2010: Associate Professor at the Department of Mechatronics and Robotics Engineering at E-JUST, Alexandria, Egypt. 

From Apr 2014: Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Science and Engineering (International Center for Science and Engineering), Waseda University

RESEARCH: 

The goal of my research is to develop wearable bioinstrumentation systems that can objectively measure human's full body Motions and Emotions. I also aim at developing evaluation tools and to define indexes that allow us to characterize the human’s movements and behaviors in order to study how different people acts during a particular tasks or interacting with robots.

TEACHING:

I am conducting several courses at the Faculty of Science and Engineering (International Center for Science and Engineering), Waseda University. I want to pursue to the excellence of my courses with several initiatives based on modern method of education that I refined during my previous teaching experience at E-JUST (Egypt) and I verified through the Faculty Development Program and the pedagogy course at Washinghton University. I want to integrate these modern pedagogic techniques with the Waseda University style of teaching based on the concepts of “Kouza” (Laboratory style) and “Monotukuri” (doing the things). To explain the key concepts that I introduced in my classes, I will give two examples:

Fundamental of Robotics
I believe that to enhance concrete experience, it is fundamental to provide the opportunity to students to apply what they learnt into new situations and solve real problems. Real problem is a “driving question” which brings focus and specificity to the learning process and serves as “driver” for subsequent learning activities. In this course I introduce a driving question that clarifies the linkage between the research and the society. The theme proposed this year is “Pragmatic robotic solutions to address the needs of the children at the Village of Hope”, which is the same of a parallel course named Project Based Learning in mechatronics provided at E-JUST. The Village of Hope is a NGO that operates at Alexandria (Egypt) with children with mental disabilities. The objective of this course is to realize a small robot controlled by the children using movement of the head (IMU) and ElectroEncephaloGrams (EEG). I am extensively using active learning techniques such as videos, discussions, flipped lectures, and laboratory practice rather than standard cram lectures.
Analysis and discussion of papers on advanced robotics
I am conducting this course to improve the presentation, paper review, and critical thinking of my students. These skills are necessary for good researchers and surely, the course will help my students to improve the quality of their future publications. The classes introduce various concepts of writing process, review, and presentation. Furthermore it aims at reviewing the latest research in robotics. Each student selects a journal paper in the robotic fields, prepares a written review, and a detailed presentation of the paper (IMRAD format). The material prepared is presented to the other colleagues and then discussed in class. Finally, all the students prepare a short report on the discussed material.

PUBLICATIONS (2013):
Journals
1       G. Trovato, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, L. Jamone, J. Ham, K. Hashimoto, and A. Takanishi, “Cross-cultural study on human-robot greeting interaction: acceptance and discomfort by Egyptians and Japanese,” Paladyn, Journal of Behavioral Robotics, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 83–93, 2013.
2.       O. Salah, A. A. Ramadan, S. Sessa, A. A. Ismail, M. Fujie, and A. Takanishi, “ANFIS-based Sensor Fusion System of Sit-to-stand for Elderly People Assistive Device Protocols,” IJAC, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 405–413, 2013.
3.       Z Lin, M Uemura, M Zecca, S Sessa, H Ishii, M Tomikawa, M Hashizume, A Takanishi “Objective Skill Evaluation for Laparoscopic Training Based on Motion Analysis” IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering 60 (4), 977 – 985, 2013.
4.       L. Bartolomeo, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, Z. Lin, H. Ishii, and A. Takanishi “Induced Mental Stress in Peg Board Training: Motion and Muscle Analysis for Performance Evaluation” International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery June 2013, Volume 8, Issue 1 Supplement, pp 162-163.
5.       S. Sessa, M. Zecca, Z. Lin, L. Bartolomeo, H. Ishii, and A. Takanishi, “A Methodology for the Performance Evaluation of Inertial Measurement Units” Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems 71 (2), 143-157, 2013.
Conferences
1.      T. Chihara, C. Wang, A. Niibori, T. Oishio, Y. Matsuoka, S. Sessa, H. Ishii, Y. Nakae, N. Matsuoka, T. Takayama, and A. Takanishi, “Development of a head robot with facial expression for training on neurological disorders,” in 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), 2013, pp. 1384–1389.
2.      S. Cosentino, T. Kishi, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, L. Bartolomeo, K. Hashimoto, T. Nozawa, and A. Takanishi, “Human-humanoid robot social interaction: Laughter,” in 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), 2013, pp. 1396–1401.
3.      W. Kong, S. Sessa, S. Cosentino, M. Zecca, K. Saito, C. Wang, U. Imtiaz, Z. Lin, L. Bartolomeo, H. Ishii, T. Ikai, and A. Takanishi, “Development of a real-time IMU-based motion capture system for gait rehabilitation,” in 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), 2013, pp. 2100–2105.
4.      Y. Matsuoka, L. Bartolomeo, T. Chihara, U. Imtiaz, K. Saito, W. Kong, Y. Noh, Y. Kasuya, M. Nagai, M. Ozaki, C. Wang, S. Sessa, H. Ishii, M. Zecca, and A. Takanishi, “A novel approach to evaluate skills in Endotracheal Intubation using biomechanical measurement system,” in 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO), 2013, pp. 1456–1461.
5.      M. H. Merzban, M. Abdellatif, H. Abbas, and S. Sessa, “Toward multi-stage decoupled visual SLAM system,” in 2013 IEEE International Symposium on Robotic and Sensors Environments (ROSE), 2013, pp. 172–177.
6.      O. Salah, A. Asker, A. M. R. Fath El-Bab, S. M. F. Assal, A. A. Ramadan, S. Sessa, and A. Abo-Ismail, “Development of parallel manipulator sit to stand assistive device for elderly people,” in 2013 IEEE Workshop on Advanced Robotics and its Social Impacts (ARSO), 2013, pp. 27–32.
7.      G. Trovato, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, L. Jamone, J. Ham, K. Hashimoto, and A. Takanishi, “Towards culture-specific robot customisation: A study on greeting interaction with Egyptians,” in 2013 IEEE RO-MAN, 2013, pp. 447–452.
8.      L. Bartolomeo, Y. Noh, Y. Kasuya, M. Nagai, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, S. Cosentino, K. Saito, Z. Lin, H. Ishii, and A. Takanishi, “Biomechanical Evaluation of the Phases during Simulated Endotracheal Intubation (ETI): Pilot Study on the Effect of Different Laryngoscopes”, 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS, 2013, pp.  4887-4890.
9.     M. Zecca, K. Saito, S. Sessa, L. Bartolomeo, Z. Lin, S. Cosentino, H. Ishii, T. Ikai, and A. Takanishi, “Use of an ultra-miniaturized IMU-based motion capture system for objective evaluation and assessment of walking skills”, 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS, 2013, pp.  4883-4886.
10.   S. Sessa, K. Saito, M. Zecca, L. Bartolomeo, Z. Lin, S. Cosentino, H. Ishii, T. Ikai, and A. Takanishi, “Walking assessment in the phase space by using Ultra-miniaturized Inertial Measurement Units”, 2013 IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics and Automation (ICMA 2013).
11.   Best Conference Paper Finalist Awards: U. Imtiaz, L. Bartolomeo, Z. Lin, S. Sessa, H. Ishii, K. Saito, M. Zecca, and A. Takanishi, “Design of a Wireless Miniature Low cost EMG Sensor using Gold Plated Dry Electrodes for Biomechanics research”, 2013 IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics and Automation (ICMA 2013).
12.   C. Wang, Y. Noh, M. Tokumoto, C. Terunaga, M. Yusuke, H. Ishii, S. Sessa, M. Zecca, A. Takanishi, K. Hatake, and S. Shoji, “Development of a human-like neurologic model to simulate the influences of diseases for neurologic examination training,” in 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2013, pp. 4826–4831.
13.   S. Cosentino, T. Kishi, M. Zecca, S. Sessa, L. Bartolomeo, K. Hashimoto, T. Nozawa, and A. Takanishi, “Human-robot emotional interaction: Laughter,” presented at the RSJ 2013 - the 31th annual conference of the Robotics Society of Japan, Tokyo, Japan, 2013.